LIAM RIMMINGTON - INTERVIEW

 

Tell us about yourself. What is your background, and how did you get into photography?

I'm a nature, portrait and lifestyle photographer based in Sheffield, England. I've been shooting for around 6 years - buying my first camera as a new creative outlet when I started to lose interest in making music (I used to play guitar in a hardcore band).

Please provide us with a list of the gear you use on a regular basis:

My camera body is a Canon 5D Mark III and I use a very simple prime lens set up, Sigma 35mm f/1.4 and Sigma 85mm f/1.4. The only other thing you'd see me use on a regular basis is my trusty prism.

What does your post-production process look like?

It all depends on the image, but typically I import directly into Lightroom, cull to select the images I want, apply a Tribe preset and tweak, then sync the edit to multiple shots. I can then go through shot by shot and tweak as needed. If the image needs to be cleaned up in any way then I open into Photoshop, make the necessary adjustments and save back into Lightroom.

Over time I have realised the importance of creating a consistent aesthetic across a series of images, and learned how to dial back my edits to suit each image.

How has your photography style evolved over time?

I think the most obvious evolution is my edits becoming more refined. When I started out and I was new to the editing process my edits were very heavy and overbearing, they were also inconsistent between images in the same set. Over time I have realised the importance of creating a consistent aesthetic across a series of images, and learned how to dial back my edits to suit each image.

What are your favourite tools for capturing, editing, and enhancing your photographs?

When it comes to capturing I love to use light manipulators such as a glass prism, chandelier ring and copper pipe to create reflections and light effects in the shot.
With editing you'll often find me playing around in the Calibration section at the bottom of Lightroom, pushing and pulling the RGB Primary sliders to create ethereal looks to my shots, it's a lot of fun.

What is your greatest piece of advice for emerging photographers?

Shoot for yourself first and foremost! It's all too easy these days to only consider what your followers might like. Capture what makes you feel something in a way that excites you because that's how passion is fed. If you don't feed your passion it becomes difficult to sustain it.

What type of photography do you most enjoy?

I love to shoot nature, whether that's sprawling landscapes or the details of a flower or plant. Shooting nature strengthens my connection with the planet; it gives me the opportunity to switch off from the buzz of urban life and reset myself.

liam@instillmotion.co_Liam Rimmington_1888AD_6.jpg
Shoot for yourself first and foremost! It’s all to easy these days to only consider what your followers might like, but capture what makes you feel something in a way that excites you because that’s how passion is fed. If you don’t feed your passion it becomes difficult to sustain it.

What are you discouraged about in your work/business? What encourages you?

I work full time as a retail manager which means I don't get as much time to shoot as someone doing photography full time. Most of my days off are filled with shooting/editing but I also have to give myself time to rest. It can be difficult to balance. What encourages me is when people reach out to ask me to shoot their portrait, business or wedding because they specifically want my style of photography. It's always so uplifting to know people love what you create.

When was a time you thought you would/had failed? How did you overcome it?

Last year Canon invited me to be part of the promotion campaign for the Canon 6D Mark II. They flew me to Slovenia and filmed me using the camera around the amazing Triglav National Park. It was an amazing opportunity but also incredibly nerve racking. Firstly, I've never been filmed before so that came with a certain amount of nervousness, but I was also expected to capture hundreds of photos whilst I was being filmed for Canon to use on their official website and social media. There was a very rigid schedule and not much time at each location which made it even more challenging. I reminded myself of how exciting and unique of an opportunity it was and that helped me to enjoy the experience and relax into capturing everything I needed.

What defines success for you as a photographer? If you never achieve that, will you still be satisfied with what you do?

I think success for me would be to create photography that outlasts me.
My satisfaction comes from the enjoyment of the process of capturing, editing and sharing my photography, so I'll always get that satisfaction even if I don't manage to create something that would be remembered beyond my lifetime.


YOU CAN FIND LIAM ONLINE HERE:

Website:

www.instillmotion.co

Instagram:

www.instagram.com/liampea